Top 20 Misspelled Words: How To Prepare For A SpellEvent?

Top 20 Misspelled Words (Credit: Google images)

Hi Teacher(s).

Are you preparing your students for the Franklin Electronic Publisher’s SpellEvent?

Could it be you simply want to help your students become better spellers?

Whatever your motivation is, you should know the top 20 most commonly misspelled words.

How you work with these words is quite another matter.

You could have your students memorize the correct spellings. Just give the kids a list of 20 words and tell them you will test them.

Believe me, they will memorize the spellings. So, that’s the easy way to do it. The fast way. But is there another way?

Maybe. You could give these 20 words – in a list – to your students. Ask the student to analyse the words. See if they can formulate a theory of why the words are often misspelled.

In my opinion, it will make them better spellers, every spelling “truth” they can discover for themselves.

Think about it. You get a chance to play “Socrates”, knowing everything, while professing to know only what the student tells you, and then leading the student on the path of discovery with a “why do you say that” question, one after another, until the light bulb goes off in the students head about how spelling works, what patterns exist, what things you have to be aware of, etc.

And now comes the best part. After the students have worked a reasonable time on an analysis of what is causing the word to be misspelled, then you provide them with a link, this link:

http://bit.ly/aYzN3P

Now tell the students to check their answers with the answers they find at this site…

Oh, you have to click on the link to find out what the Top 20 Misspelled Words are….

Best regards,
Thomas

Source: Daily Telegraph 06 August 2010

Advertisements

About profesorbaker

Thomas Baker is the Past-President of TESOL Chile (2010-2011). He enjoys writing about a wide variety of topics. The source and inspiration for his writing comes from his family.
This entry was posted in Education, EFL and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s