Dan Brown: An Open Letter to Educators

Classrooms of the past century(Credit: Google images)

I came across this video today thanks to my search for a vid to go with my post about Open Educational Resources https://profesorbaker.wordpress.com/2011/07/18/the-urgency-of-teachers-sharing-resources-a-moral-imperative/.

Dan Brown, who is not the author of the DaVinci Code, is a very articulate person. His views appear to be nothing more than a rant by a disgruntled student at first. However, I beg you to hear him out. Stay with him to the end. Listen, because somewhere, I have the suspicion that he may be speaking for your students, all students the world over, the students of the 21st Century.

He has a very interesting message about the importance of learning in the 21st Century and the implications for teachers.

What are your reactions? Do you agree with Dan, or is he what he appears to be, a disgruntled, disappointed, deopout? What do you think? By the way, it’s OK to agree with some of what he says, none of what he says, or all of what he says.

For example, there are some points I’d ask for more supporting facts
on. There are others that ring true to my experience, and others that must truly be from the realm of Dan’s own experience. Thus, valid for him, but maybe not universally applicable for all.

Whatever your reaction will be, there is one thing that is true: This video will not leave you indifferent. It will make you think, make you reflect on your practice, and in the end, therein lies its value to you and I. As educators, we must use our ability to think critically about our beliefs regarding teaching and learning in the 21st Century.

Enjoy the video…

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About profesorbaker

Thomas Baker is the Past-President of TESOL Chile (2010-2011). He enjoys writing about a wide variety of topics. The source and inspiration for his writing comes from his family.
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