English Language Requirements For People Seeking UK Citizenship

Excerpt: Life In The UK, 3rd EditionLife in UKBritain is a fantastic place to live: a modern, thriving society with a long and illustrious history. Our people have been at the heart of the world’s political, scientific, industrial and cultural development. We are proud of our record of welcoming new migrants who will add to the diversity and dynamism of our national life.

Applying to become a permanent resident or citizen of the UK is an important decision and commitment. You will be agreeing to accept the responsibilities which go with permanent residence and to respect the laws, values and traditions of the UK. Good citizens are an asset to the UK. We welcome those seeking to make a positive contribution to our society.

Passing the Life in the UK test is part of demonstrating that you are ready to become a permanent migrant to the UK. This handbook is designed to support you in your preparation. It will help you to integrate into society and play a full role in your local community. It will also help ensure that you have a broad general knowledge of the culture, laws and history of the UK…”

Prove your knowledge of English for citizenship and settling
Source: Gov.UK 19 Feb 2019

Overview

Who does not need to prove their knowledge of English
Approved English language qualifications
If your degree was taught or researched in English

Overview

You might need to prove your knowledge of the English language if you’re 18 or over and applying for citizenship or to settle in the UK (known as ‘indefinite leave to remain’).

You can prove it by having either:

– an English qualification at B1, B2, C1 or C2 level
– a degree taught or researched in English

You do not need to prove your knowledge of English in certain circumstances.

**Your citizenship or settlement application will be refused if you send the wrong qualifications.

Who does not need to prove their knowledge of English

You do not need to prove your knowledge of English if you’re:

– aged 65 or over
– unable to, because of a long-term physical or mental condition

You must provide a completed exemption form from a doctor confirming your physical or mental condition.

Nationalities that are exempt

You will not need to prove your knowledge of English if you’re a citizen of:

Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Canada, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, New Zealand, Republic of Ireland (for citizenship only)
St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago,
USA.

Approved English language qualifications

You can prove your knowledge of English by having a recognised English test qualification from an approved test centre.

You need to have a certificate to prove you have the qualification, or be able to view your results online.

You can only use English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) qualifications if they’re on the list. You cannot use other qualifications, for example GCSEs, A levels or National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs).

If your qualification has run out

Some recognised test qualifications only last for 2 years. You can still use a B1 level qualification that you took more than 2 years ago in 2 situations.

1. Applying for citizenship
You can use a B1 level qualification that’s run out if you’re applying for citizenship and it was accepted when you settled in the UK.

2. It does not matter if the B1 level test you took is not on the current list of recognised tests. You do not need to take another test.

Applying to settle in the UK

You can use a B1 level qualification that’s run out if both of the following are true:

– it’s on the current list of recognised tests
– it was accepted for another UK immigration application, for example when you got permission to enter.

If your degree was taught or researched in English

You can prove your knowledge of English by having a degree that was taught or researched in English.

If you have a degree from a UK university, you only need your degree certificate.

If your degree is not from a UK university, you’ll need your degree certificate and one of the following:

– a letter or certificate from UK NARIC confirming the equivalent level of your degree, plus an official letter from your university with your name and degree confirming that your degree was taught in English
– an official certificate from your university confirming the degree was taught or researched in a majority English-speaking country (except Canada)
– If you’ve lost your certificate or you’re waiting for graduation

You must have proof that you’ve passed your degree. This can be either:

– an official transcript with your name, the name of the institution, your degree and confirmation of the award
– an official letter from your university confirming it cannot reissue your certificate or when it will be issued

Your letter must include:

– your name
– your degree
– the date the degree was or will be awarded

Life In The UK Citizenship Test: A Journey To Citizenship 2nd Edition

Life in the United Kingdom: A guide for new residents, 3rd Edition

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About profesorbaker

Thomas Baker is the Past-President of TESOL Chile (2010-2011). He enjoys writing about a wide variety of topics. The source and inspiration for his writing comes from his family.
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